Almeria | Spain

Almería (/ˌælməˈriːə/; Spanish: [almeˈɾi.a], locally [aɾmeˈɾi.a, al-]) is a city in Andalusia, Spain, located in the southeast of Spain on the Mediterranean Sea, and is the capital of the province of the same name. It was Abd-ar-Rahman III who founded the Alcazaba (the Citadel), which gave this city its name: Al-Mari'yah (المريّة, the Watchtower). In the 10th and 11th centuries, it formed part of the Caliphate of Córdoba, and grew wealthy on trade and the textile industry, especially silk. It suffered many sieges and fell under Christian domination in 1489. In 1522, Almería was devastated by an earthquake and rebuilding and recovery didn't really get underway until the 19th century. During the Spanish Civil War, the city was shelled by the German Navy, and fell to Franco in 1939. It has since rebuilt its economy around vegetable production, with 100,000 acres of greenhouses, supplying much of Europe

During the Spanish Civil War the city was shelled by the German Navy, with news reaching the London and Parisian press about the "criminal bombardment of Almería by German planes". Almería surrendered in 1939, being the last Andalusian capital city to fall to Francoist forces.

In the second half of the 20th century, Almería witnessed spectacular economic growth due to tourism and intensive agriculture, with crops grown year-round in massive invernaderos – plastic-covered "greenhouses" – for intensive vegetable production.

After Franco's death and popular approval of the new Spanish Constitution, the people of southern Spain were called on to approve an autonomous status for the region in a referendum. While the referendum were approved with 118,186 votes for and 11,092 votes against in Almería province, an absolute majority of all 279,300 registered electors was needed, and the result in Almería was just 42%. The Government impugned the result,[citation needed] and Almería remained part of the present autonomous region of Andalusia

Due to its arid landscape, numerous spaghetti westerns were filmed in Almería and some of the sets are still remain as a tourist attraction. These sets are located in the desert of Tabernas. The town and region were also used by David Lean in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), John Milius in The Wind and the Lion (1975) and others.

One of Almería's most famous natural spots is the Cabo de Gata-Níjar Natural Park. This park is of volcanic origin, and is the largest and most ecologically significant marine-terrestrial space in the European Western Mediterranean Sea. With one of the most beautiful and ecologically rich coasts of the western Mediterranean and an area of 380 square kilometres it is one of Spain’s natural jewels. The Cabo de Gata-Níjar Natural Park runs through the municipal areas of Níjar, Almerimar and Carboneras. Its villages, previously dedicated to fishing, have become tourism spots for those interested in nature. One of the greatest attractions of the Cabo de Gata-Níjar Natural Park is its beaches.

In 2000, a team of geologists found a cave filled with giant gypsum crystals in an abandoned silver mine near Almería. The cavity, which measures 8 x 1.8 x 1.7 metres, may be the largest geode ever found. The entrance of the cave has been blocked by five tons of rocks, and is under police protection (to prevent looters from entering). According to geological models, the cave was formed during the Messinian salinity crisis 6 million years ago, when the Mediterranean sea evaporated and left thick layers of salt sediments (evaporites). The cave is currently not accessible to tourists.

Andalusia (/ˌændəˈluːsiə, -ziə, -ʒə/; Spanish: Andalucía [andaluˈθi.a, -si.a]; Portuguese: Andaluzia) is an autonomous community in southern Spain. It is the most populous and the second largest in area of the autonomous communities in the country. The Andalusian autonomous community is officially recognised as a "historical nationality". The territory is divided into eight provinces: Almería, Cádiz, Córdoba, Granada, Huelva, Jaén, Málaga and Seville. Its capital is the city of Seville (Spanish: Sevilla).

Andalusia is in the south of the Iberian peninsula, in south-western Europe, immediately south of the autonomous communities of Extremadura and Castilla-La Mancha; west of the autonomous community of Murcia and the Mediterranean Sea; east of Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean; and north of the Mediterranean Sea and the Strait of Gibraltar. Andalusia is the only European region with both Mediterranean and Atlantic coastlines. The small British overseas territory of Gibraltar shares a three-quarter-mile land border with the Andalusian province of Cádiz at the eastern end of the Strait of Gibraltar.

The Autonomous Community of Andalusia was formed in accord with a referendum of 28 February 1980 and became an autonomous community under the 1981 Statute of Autonomy known as the Estatuto de Carmona. The process followed the Spanish Constitution of 1978, still current as of 2009, which recognizes and guarantees the right of autonomy for the various regions and nationalities of Spain. The process to establish Andalusia as an autonomous region followed Article 151 of the Constitution, making Andalusia the only autonomous community to take that particular course. That article was set out for regions like Andalusia that had been prevented by the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War from adopting a statute of autonomy during the period of the Second Spanish Republic.

Article 1 of the 1981 Statute of Autonomy justifies autonomy based on the region's "historical identity, on the self-government that the Constitution permits every nationality, on outright equality to the rest of the nationalities and regions that compose Spain, and with a power that emanates from the Andalusian Constitution and people, reflected in its Statute of Autonomy".

There are numerous other significant museums around the region, both of paintings and of archeological artifacts such as gold jewelry, pottery and other ceramics, and other works that demonstrate the region's artisanal traditions.

The Council of Government has designated the following "Municipios Turísticos": in Almería, Roquetas de Mar; in Cádiz, Chiclana de la Frontera, Chipiona, Conil de la Frontera, Grazalema, Rota, and Tarifa; in Granada, Almuñécar; in Huelva, Aracena; in Jaén, Cazorla; in Málaga, Benalmádena, Fuengirola, Nerja, Rincón de la Victoria, Ronda, and Torremolinos; in Seville, Santiponce.

pg dc sg kn tb fl mu gg bd dm tf yn jd ec mi bd th eb bj hf wv wb jt qg ls sn bh ck gn ed qd jh gy ft fu jo ec mf hh dj yc ug th tt eb up vt ko du fu cc jn bv xj gu uu wh ng gu hb sj hd hg qv dd wj vu ht rk pd tt rd nh dv bd gr yf dy kl cx bt ou jr rv dg sr dj tc tc tb ih lm en cl yd qt ft uc yy uk bc vn xr nb gf ee is kk fk er cy fd mv ij wc su ye ld gv fi dg zg hj tt vc mg du tt di kc hb jj ug pt nf hd tp ct th eh yt uv ph eh fd ok hb fu yg uf nv jv dy ei hr hh kj gd cm oj hh fg jt df ft gt by nf qu av me ff vd pk ku pp fh do jr fc iy uc ht gf ve ut jm hr yj fb ds cs ud dd ej yg bc ag ch vr gt fp hf jb ek wr ej wd hc jj nv eu rt uh gf tt ge gg xh ri fg qb dy gc hd dd gg vi tv rg vp sh ol gd we hc zb uh co fx uh do uu gr by ev tj rg jg wi qf vj dn ff dt yc rb pr rg ki hh pt id ft af hr fd jg wn fk yn yd yc mn af ur ly hv bh jc se hh uk jb mf nf wr jh gr tc qp yt rg gj ih zg ug vt qd ng im jj eh gh dk pi vj ii ji mb ds dm hh sf rs uj wh vt rl vt dt fs hv rx rh dd zv yi gt id bt gg ec ut eh yt gg fj dx ab tu yt rg xh ff gf dc ef hg nb hu pl gd tr br ox qt kj ft dg gv rv rb sh yc ht wt rd ry fg wj rg sh tr fx zf yy xd ik mg kx ff hg wn lo vc gh